Types of Dry Eye Conditions

Houston | LASEK | Dr. Yee | Dry EyeDry eye is a sign of an ocular surface irritation, infection or inflammation. It’s symptomatic in a number of conditions, and the course of treatment can only be determined after a thorough examination and testing of your eyes.

Dr. Yee treats all ocular surface disorders, including:

  • Dry Eye Syndrome
  • Computer Vision Syndrome
  • Meibomian Gland Dysfunction (MGD)
  • Blepharitis – Anterior & Posterior
  • Pterygium
  • Graft vs. Host Disease-related Dry Eye

Dry Eye Syndrome
Dry eye occurs either as a complication of a specific condition (as in the case of Graft vs. Host disease) or as a result of advanced age, contact lens usage, Meibomian Gland Dysfunction (MGD), Blephartitis (inflammation of the eye lid), thyroid conditions, specific medical conditions (Sjogren’s syndrome, Parkinson’s, rheumatoid arthritis, lupus and diabetes), certain medications, air-conditioning/heating, smoke, hot/dry/windy climates, hormonal changes, and vitamin A deficiency. Whatever the source, the outcome is reduced moisture levels and eyes that itch, burn, tear excessively, become sensitive to light, and become irritated and red.

Computer Vision Syndrome (CVS)
Have you ever noticed that when you work for several hours in front of a computer screen that you begin to notice eye fatigue, blurry vision, eyestrain and dryness? These are all classic symptoms of dry eye related to computer use or Computer Vision Syndrome (CVS). Our research suggests that CVS is associated with a significant Meibomian Gland Dysfunction and possibly an association of  high total cholesterol in the body.

CVS is a temporary condition that can be relieved with artificial tears, frequent breaks and the use of protective eyewear like Dr. Yee’s patented Micro-Environment Glasses (MEGs) from SeeFit. MEGs feature Moist-Sure Shields that help lock in moisture around the eye, keeping them hydrated as you work. These patented glasses are especially helpful for people who must spend prolonged periods (more than 3-5 hours) in front of a computer.

You can purchase custom-tailored MEGs at www.seefit.net or speak to Dr. Yee to obtain a pair from him.

Meibomian Gland Dysfunction
Meibomian Gland Dysfunction is one of the major causes of dry eye. It occurs when the meibomian glands, which are responsible for production and secretion of lipids from the eyelid, become blocked. Blockage affects the quality and stability of the tear film, resulting in dry eye symptoms. The approximately 50 glands on the upper eyelids and 25 on the lower help prevent tears from spilling onto the cheek by sequestering tears between the rim of the eyelid and the eyeball as well as help keep closed eyes airtight.

Blepharitis
Blepharitis is an inflammation of the eyelids caused by a bacterial infection or dysfunction of the meibomian gland. When this gland becomes plugged or infected, the oil layer necessary to retain tear film diminishes, resulting in rapid evaporation of the water component of the tear film and problematic dry eye symptoms. The plugging of the gland is associated with the formation of styes or chalazion in the eyelids. As mentioned earlier, there is a higher risk of having an abnormal cholesterol level if you are diagnosed with Blepharitis, so Dr. Yee will always ask for you to follow up with your internist.

Pterygium

A pterygium is a non-cancerous growth of the clear, thin tissue that lays over the white part of the eye – the conjunctiva. Patients may experience pterygium in one or both eyes. It is more commonly found in individuals who spend a lot of time outdoors and are exposed to the sun and wind – two causes of dry eye. Recurrences are very high in pterygium surgery upwards of 50-90% .  That is why it is important to treat the ocular surface aggressively if dry eye is present and use adjunctive surgical approaches such as amniotic membrane grafts, conjunctival autograft, and, in some cases, the addition of  mitomycin C. Recurrent pterygium typically will have increased risk for recurrences.

Graft vs. Host Disease
Graft-vs-host disease (GVHD) is a complication that sometimes develops after an allogeneic bone marrow transplant. GVHD occurs when immune cells in the transplanted tissue (or graft) identify cells in the patient’s body (the host) as foreign and attack them. Dry eye is a major complication associated with GVHD affecting 50% of patients with allogeneic bone marrow transplants. Dr. Yee has seen great improvement in his GVHD patients with the use of autologous serum drops.

Graft vs. Host Disease (GVHD) is a complication that can develop after an allogeneic bone marrow transplant. GVHD occurs when immune cells in the transplanted tissue (or graft) identify cells in the patient’s body (the host) as foreign and attack them.

Dry eye is a major complication associated with GVHD, affecting 50 percent of patients with allogeneic bone marrow transplants. Dr. Yee has seen great improvement in his GVHD patients with the use of autologous serum drops.

End your dry eye suffering today. Call (713) 559-5212, (832) 289-2020 or send an email to richard@drrichardyee.com.

Contact Dr. Yee for a free consultation to learn more about his practice and how he can change your life.